Clinical Trials

Every treatment that has ever made a difference in cancer care was once a part of a clinical trial. MUSC Hollings Cancer Center is committed to offering the best treatments available today while searching for even better ones for the future. Ask your doctor if a clinical trial is right for you.

 

Brain Cancer Trials

  • STUDY10294

    A Phase 3, Randomized, Open-Label Study To Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Eflornithine with Lomustine Compared to Lomustine Alone in Patients with Anaplastic Astrocytoma That Progress/Recur After Irradiation and Adjuvant Temozolomide Chemotherapy

    The primary objectives of this study are to demonstrate superiority in OS and comparable safety when eflornithine is added to lomustine compared to lomustine alone in patients with AA that progress/recur after irradiation and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy.

    Study Information



  • STUDY10485

    A Phase 1, Open-Label, Cohort Expansion First-in-Human Study of the Safety, Tolerability, Activity and Pharmacokinetics of REGN3767 (anti-LAG-3 mAb) Administered Alone or in Combination with REGN2810 (anti-PD-1 mAb) in Patients with Advanced Malignancies

    To evaluate safety and PK in order to determine an RP2D of REGN3767 as monotherapy and in combination with REGN2810 in patients with advanced malignancies, including lymphoma. To assess preliminary anti-tumor activity of REGN3767 alone and in combination with REGN2810 (separately by cohort) as measured by ORR.

    Study Information



  • STUDY11437

    Utilizing Response- and Biology-Based Risk Factors to Guide Therapy in Patients with Non-High-Risk Neuroblastoma



    Study Information



  • STUDY12377

    A Phase 3 Study of 131I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG) or Crizotinib Added to Intensive Therapy for Children With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma (NBL)

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.

    Study Information



  • STUDY12697

    A Phase 2 Study of Reduced Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Average-Risk WNT-Driven Medulloblastoma Patients

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced doses of radiation therapy to the brain and spine (craniospinal) and chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed type of brain tumor called WNT)/Wingless (WNT)-driven medulloblastoma.

    Study Information